Pages

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Doberman

doberman

The Doberman Pinscher is a dog of contradictions. Although he has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. And no, "loyal" isn't a euphemism for "only likes his owner." It's the real thing, a tremendous bond between dog and human that lies at the heart of the Doberman's enduring popularity. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog -- unless you threaten his family.
But the bad reputation isn't entirely undeserved. Health and temperament problems became a serious issue in the breed with its growing popularity, and continue to plague the carelessly bred dogs you'll find in pet stores, through Internet retailers, and at many of the big kennels advertising in the backs of magazines. If you want the steady, protective, intelligent Doberman of your dreams, be prepared to do your due dilligence to find him.
A Doberman is right for you if you're ready to provide loving leadership to your dog, train him consistently and fairly and give him plenty of exercise and outlet for his considerable intelligence. And don't underestimate that intelligence: the Doberman is among the smartest of all dog breeds, and one whose owners need to pay attention lest they find themselves outsmarted. If you expect your dog to spend his days in the backyard and his evenings keeping you company while you play video games, you’d better be prepared for a barking, bored, destructive dog instead of the devoted companion you thought you were bringing into your home.
Developed as a guard dog, the Doberman has an innate ability not only to protect his family but also to anticipate danger and threats. Because he's so smart, he's not often wrong, but if the Doberman isn't socialized and trained to behave appropriately around strangers, he may show excessive suspicion of guests in your home – suspicion that can turn into aggression.
Many people want a Doberman for purposes of protection, but almost no one really needs a trained protection dog – most people or families simply need a watchdog and a deterrent. The Doberman's reputation, intelligence, instinctive ability to evaluate threats, and his loyalty to and innate protectiveness of his human family are all that's needed to accomplish those goals, so don't get a "trained protection dog" that you don't need and probably can't handle. A well-bred, well-trained, properly socialized Doberman who lives with his family will protect them as part of his nature.
One of the key phrases there is "lives with his family." While some Dobermans are raised successfully in kennel situations, these are working dogs that have demanding and interesting tasks to do that give them the exercise and mental stimulation the dogs need. If your Doberman is a family pet, he needs to live indoors with your family. Otherwise, he'll be lonely, bored and destructive – and less, rather than more, likely to protect you.

If you do share your home with a Doberman, you'll find him to be a fairly easy dog to care for. Just keep his nails trimmed, his body lean and exercised, and brush him weekly to keep shedding to a minimum.
An alert watchdog, the Doberman can be a barker, so help yours develop appropriate barking behavior when young so it doesn't become a nuisance later on.

While most people are familiar only with the black Doberman with rust markings, Dobermans actually come in a number of colors: black with rust-colored markings; blue (actually gray) with rust markings; various shades of red-brown with rust markings; and a light tan color called "Isabella," which also has rust markings.
Be aware that white or cream Dobermans are a genetic mutation that is associated with severe health problems; they are not the prized and expensive rarity some people will try to market them as. There is no test for the albino gene, but good breeders do everything they can to avoid producing albino Dobermans. Avoid these dogs and the breeders who produce and sell them.


Other Quick Facts 

The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.


The History of Dobermans
Tax collector Louis Dobermann needed a guard dog to keep the monies he carried safe from thieves. To create the intelligent, reliable guard dog that he had in mind, he crossed shorthaired shepherd dogs with Rottweilers, black and tan terriers, and German Pinschers. Sleek dogs such as Greyhounds and Weimaraners may also have been part of his “recipe.”

Before long, he was producing dogs of a distinct type. The first Doberman Pinschers, as they became known, were seen at a dog show in Erfurt, Germany, in 1897. Three years later the breed received official recognition as a German breed.
The American Kennel Club registered its first Doberman in 1908, and the Doberman Pinscher Club of America was formed in 1921. Throughout their history, Dobermans have made a name for themselves as police and military dogs.

During World War II, the United States Marine Corp used Dobermans in combat as sentries, messengers, and scouts. While liberating Guam, 25 Marine war dogs died. Dobermans are seen in archival footage of the battle on Okinawa, one of the bloodiest conflicts in American history. In 1994 a bronze memorial statue of a Doberman commissioned by the United Doberman Club was erected in Guam. The memorial is called "Always Faithful." In 2001 when the World Trade Center towers collapsed, search and rescue Dobermans looked for survivors and bodies at Ground Zero.
The Doberman still has a fearsome reputation, but the secret that has made him one of the AKC’s most popular breeds over the years is his devotion to and love for his family. It’s no wonder that the Doberman is 14 th in AKC registrations, up from 23 rd a decade ago.


The Doberman Temperament and Personality


doberman dog

The Doberman’s qualities of intelligence, trainability and courage have made him capable of performing many different roles, from police or military dog to family protector and friend. The ideal Doberman is energetic, watchful, determined, alert and obedient, never shy or vicious. That temperament and relationship with people only occurs when the Doberman lives closely with his family so that he can build that bond of loyalty for which he is famous. A Doberman who is left out in the backyard alone will never become a loving protector but instead a fearful dog who is aggressive toward everyone, including his own family. Never do that to a dog. When the Doberman is loved, socialized and trained, there is no more wonderful companion.
The perfect Doberman doesn’t come ready-made from the breeder. Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, countersurfing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence.

Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at eight weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him.

Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines (like kennel cough) to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality. Whatever you want from a Doberman, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

QUOTES ABOUT DOGS 2

“There are times when even the best manager is like the little boy with the big dog — waiting to see where the dog wants to go so he can take him there.”
Lee Iacocca (former president and CEO of Chrysler)


"Anybody who doesn't know what soap tastes like never washed a dog."
Franklin P. Jones (humorist and PR executive)

“A dog can’t think that much about what he’s doing, he just does what feels right.”
Barbara Kingsolver (author, Animal Dreams)

"When the Man waked up he said, 'What is Wild Dog doing here?' And the Woman said, 'His name is not Wild Dog any more, but the First Friend, because he will be our friend for always and always and always.'"
Rudyard Kipling (author, The Jungle Book)

“Once you have had a wonderful dog, a life without one, is a life diminished.”
Dean Koontz (author, Whispers)

"Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful."
Ann Landers (a.k.a. Eppie Lederer; famous advice columnist)




"I care not for a man's religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it."
Abraham Lincoln (16th President of the United States)

“A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.”
Jack London (author, The Call of the Wild)

“Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.”
Groucho Marx (comedian)

“Dogs don't rationalize. They don't hold anything against a person. They don't see the outside of a human but the inside of a human.”
Cesar Millan (dog trainer)

“Dogs never bite me. Just humans.”
Marilyn Monroe (actress, Some Like It Hot)

"No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as the dog does."
Christopher Morley (author, Kitty Foyle)

"If you think dogs can't count, try putting three dog biscuits in your pocket and then give him only two of them."
Phil Pastoret (author, Our Boarding House)

“I think dogs are the most amazing creatures; they give unconditional love. For me, they are the role model for being alive.”
Gilda Radner (comedienne)

"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers (actor, A Connecticut Yankee)

"The average dog is a nicer person than the average person."
Andy Rooney (contributor, 60 Minutes)

"I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult."
Rita Rudner (comedienne)

"Happiness is a warm puppy."
Charles M. Schulz (cartoonist, Peanuts)

“If you eliminate smoking and gambling, you will be amazed to find that almost all an Englishman's pleasures can be, and mostly are, shared by his dog.”
George Bernard Shaw (playwright)

"I've seen a look in dogs' eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts."
John Steinbeck (author, The Grapes of Wrath)

"You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us."
Robert Louis Stevenson (author, Treasure Island)

“Dogs got personality. Personality goes a long way.”
Quentin Tarantino (director and screenwriter, Pulp Fiction)

“Some of my best leading men have been dogs and horses.”
Elizabeth Taylor (actress, Cleopatra)

"If I have any beliefs about immortality, it is that certain dogs I have known will go to heaven, and very, very few persons."
James Thurber (author, “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”)

“A hungry dog hunts best.”
Lee Trevino (golfer)

"If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog."
Harry S. Truman (33rd President of the United States)

"Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in."
Mark Twain (author, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer)

"Ever consider what our dogs must think of us? I mean, here we come back from a grocery store with the most amazing haul, chicken, pork, half a cow. They must think we're the greatest hunters on earth!"
Anne Tyler (author, The Accidental Tourist)

“A dog will teach you unconditional love. If you can have that in your life, things won't be too bad.”
Robert Wagner (actor, The Longest Day)

“Let sleeping dogs lie.”
Robert Walpole (first Prime Minister of Great Britain)

"My dog is worried about the economy because Alpo is up to $3.00 a can. That's almost $21.00 in dog money."
Joe Weinstein (comedian)

"If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience."
Woodrow Wilson (28th President of the United States)

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Horses a new vision



Horses and humans have an ancient relationship. Asian nomads probably domesticated the first horses some 4,000 years ago, and the animals remained essential to many human societies until the advent of the engine. Horses still hold a place of honor in many cultures, often linked to heroic exploits in war.
There is only one species of domestic horse, but around 400 different breeds that specialize in everything from pulling wagons to racing. All horses are grazers.

While most horses are domestic, others remain wild. Feral horses are the descendents of once-tame animals that have run free for generations. Groups of such horses can be found in many places around the world. Free-roaming North American mustangs, for example, are the descendents of horses brought by Europeans more than 400 years ago.
Wild horses generally gather in groups of 3 to 20 animals. A stallion (mature male) leads the group, which consists of mares (females) and young foals. When young males become colts, at around two years of age, the stallion drives them away. The colts then roam with other young males until they can gather their own band of females.
The Przewalski's horse is the only truly wild horse whose ancestors were never domesticated. Ironically, this stocky, sturdy animal exists today only in captivity. The last wild Przewalski's horse was seen in Mongolia in 1968.

Horses and humans interact in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits, as well as in working activities such as police work, agriculture, entertainment, and therapy. Horses were historically used in warfare, from which a wide variety of riding and driving techniques developed, using many different styles of equipment and methods of control. Many products are derived from horses, including meat, milk, hide, hair, bone, and pharmaceuticals extracted from the urine of pregnant mares. Humans provide domesticated horses with food, water and shelter, as well as attention from specialists such as veterinarians and farriers.

When you live with an animal, such as your dog, cat or friendly family fish, it is easy to become familiar with their lifestyle habits and routines. Not only do you begin to learn about the things that they enjoy and dislike―your dog may love his tennis ball and daily walks, but hates thunder storms and other pets he doesn’t recognize―but you also get a first-hand look at their behavior.
However, there are many animals and pets that we may interact with frequently, but are not able to live with us in our homes. While we still care about these pets and enjoy their company, we do not to experience their mood and their mannerisms up close and personal, like with dogs and cats.
One particular type of outdoor animal that many people choose as a pet is a horse. In fact, these gorgeous creatures are no strangers to human interaction. The human-horse relationship dates back for centuries, with stories of the first domesticated horse popping up over 4,000 years ago. Since then, equines have become essential to many human societies and great friends to those who have brought them into their family.

Horses make a great addition to your home for many reasons. Not only are they very intelligent, loving animals, but horse riding is just one of many enjoyable activities that comes along with owning a horse. However, like with any animal, it is important to get a good understanding of their behavior and lifestyle before making them a part of your family.

Types Of Horses
When it comes to choosing a horse that is right for you, the first thing you want to decide is what kind of horse you would like. The most popular types of horses that many people choose to adopt as a pet are mares or geldings. A mare is an adult female horse who is typically over the age of three, and a gelding is a castrated male horse. Another type of horse is a stallion. However, these types of male horses have not been castrated, and are typically only handled by experienced owners.
Once you have determined which type of horse you would like, you can begin to pick out the type of breed. The easiest way to choose which breed would fit best into your lifestyle is to determine which type of riding you like to do. For instance, a Thoroughbred or Warmblood horse are great at jumping and dressing, however a Quarter Horse or a Paint is more apt for Western Riding.




Behavior and Lifestyle

The behavior of a horse can be just as unique and varied as that of a human. Their environment and their owner can have a large effect on how they will act and behave.
Horses can be kept at home as long as you have a proper boarding facility that they can make a home in. All horses need a stable and barn to reside in, as well as plenty of room to run around and get exercise. Horses also need strong, safe fences to make sure they do not get lost in the wild.
When it comes to a horses diet, they typically enjoy a hearty meal of hay. However, hay alone is not enough to provide a horse with the amount of nutrition and supplements that it needs. Luckily, there is a wide variety of equine nutrients and treats, such as Foal-Lac Pellets and VIVE Equine Treats, which can provide a horse with the essential nutrients they need for growing healthy and strong.
All in all, horses can make a great addition to any farm family as long as they receive the proper attention and care that they need. Education and learning is the key to any responsible pet ownership, therefore you should find out as much as you can before you bring these loveable pets into your home once and for all.




 FACTS ABOUT HORSES FOR KIDS
  • Horses can sleep both lying down and standing up.
  • Horses can run shortly after birth.
  • Domestic horses have a lifespan of around 25 years.
  • A 19th century horse named ‘Old Billy’ is said to have lived 62 years.
  • Horses have around 205 bones in their skeleton.
  • Horses have been domesticated for over 5000 years.
  • Horses are herbivores (plant eaters).
  • Horses have bigger eyes than any other mammal that lives on land.
  • Because horse’s eyes are on the side of their head they are capable of seeing nearly 360 degrees at one time.
  • Horses gallop at around 44 kph (27 mph).
  • The fastest recorded sprinting speed of a horse was 88 kph (55 mph).
  • Estimates suggest that there are around 60 million horses in the world.
  • Scientists believe that horses have evolved over the past 50 million years from much smaller creatures.
  • A male horse is called a stallion.
  • A female horse is called a mare.
  • A young male horse is called a colt.
  • A young female horse is called a filly.
  • Ponies are small horses.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

QUOTES ABOUT DOGS

Dogs are commonly referred to as “man’s best friend,”  famous people also had choice and lasting words for our four-legged colleagues.

"You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, 'Wow, you're right! I never would've thought of that!'”
Dave Barry (author, Dave Barry Hits Below the Beltway: A Vicious and Unprovoked Attack on Our Most Cherished Political Institutions)



"A dog teaches a boy fidelity, perseverance, and to turn around three times before lying down."
Robert Benchley (humorist and actor, Broadway Melody of 1938)

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself."
Josh Billings (a.k.a. Henry Wheeler Shaw; humorist and lecturer)



“Hounds follow those who feed them.”
Otto von Bismarck (1st Chancellor of Germany)




"Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole."
Roger Caras (photographer and writer)



"Every dog has his day, unless he loses his tail, then he has a weak-end."
June Carter Cash (singer)


“Dogs are wise. They crawl away into a quiet corner and lick their wounds and do not rejoin the world until they are whole once more.”
Agatha Christie (author, Death on the Nile)




“The world would be a nicer place if everyone had the ability to love as unconditionally as a dog.”
M.K. Clinton (author, The Returns)




“The better I get to know men, the more I find myself loving dogs.”
Charles de Gaulle (former President of the French Republic)






“The only creatures that are evolved enough to convey pure love are dogs and infants.”
Johnny Depp (actor, Pirates of the Caribbean)




"Dogs are better than human beings because they know but do not tell."
Emily Dickinson (poet, "Hope is the Thing with Feathers")



“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight; it's the size of the fight in the dog.”
Dwight D. Eisenhower (34th President of the United States)



"Why does watching a dog be a dog fill one with happiness?"
Jonathan Safran Foer (author, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close)


“There are three faithful friends: an old wife, an old dog, and ready money.”
Benjamin Franklin (Founding Father of the United States)



"Dogs love their friends and bite their enemies, quite unlike people, who are incapable of pure love and always have to mix love and hate."
Sigmund Freud (psychoanalyst)


"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea."
Robert A. Heinlein (author, Starship Troopers)



“When an eighty-five pound mammal licks your tears away, then tries to sit on your lap, it's hard to feel sad.”
Kristan Higgins (author, In Your Dreams)



“To his dog, every man is Napoleon; hence the constant popularity of dogs.”
Aldous Huxley (author, Brave New World)

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Why Fish Make Good Pets



In Britain, fish are now the third most popular pet after dogs and cats. According to a study conducted by the Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association (PFMA), the principal trade organization for the UK pet food industry, 16 percent of pet owners now own fish. Cats are in the number two spot at 19 percent, and dogs remain the most popular companions with 23 percent of UK households owning a canine. The reason for the increase in demand for fish, according to a representative of Tesco, a large UK retail chain, is that people have moved to smaller homes and rentals over the last few years, and it’s not always possible or practical to own a dog or cat.



 Reasons Fish Make Great Pets
    1. Fish are known to have a tranquil, calming effect on anyone who watches them glide serenely through the water.
    2. Generally speaking, fish are easier and less expensive to feed and care for than other pets, however, they do require a proper environment and knowledgeable caretakers.
    3. Unlike many dogs and other furry and feathered pets, fish don’t develop separation anxiety or destructive behaviors when you leave them alone at home.
    4. Fish are quiet -- you never have to worry about a barking or squawking fish upsetting the neighbors or waking a sleeping baby.
    5. Fish come in an infinite variety of sizes, shapes and stunning, vibrant colors.
    6. Fish don’t need to be walked; they don’t require a litter box; and they’ll never leave a surprise for you on your brand new carpet or the afghan your mother-in-law knitted for you last Christmas.
    7. Fish are very clean pets that don’t need to be groomed or have their teeth brushed.
    8. Your fish won’t track dirt and mud in from outdoors, or shake litter from his paws all over the house, and he doesn’t shed, slobber or drool.
    9. A fish aquarium of any size, as long it’s well maintained, can be a beautiful addition to any room in your home.
    10. Some types of fish interact with their owners, are playful, and can even be trained to do tricks. 


The best advice I can offer, especially if you’ve never kept fish before, is to do plenty of research before you take the plunge.

I’d also recommend you start small, with a fish bowl or small aquarium and two or three hardy, low-maintenance varieties like goldfish. As your interest grows, you can upgrade to a bigger, more expensive or unusual aquarium and more exotic varieties of fish.

A few initial questions you’ll need to ask yourself:


  • Are you interested in tropical freshwater fish, coldwater fish, or perhaps tropical marine fish? Believe it or not, there are more than 25,000 known species of fish and over 2,000 of these can potentially thrive in an aquarium. I recommend you only buy fish that have been bred in captivity, not taken from the ocean.


  • What do you know about the fish you’re interested in? For example: how big will it get? If it’s a large fish, will it see smaller fish in the tank as prey? If it’s a small fish, will it become prey for larger fish? Will it eat live plants in your aquarium? What kind of water best suits it (temperature, hardness, pH, etc.)? Does it need to live with other fish or alone? What does it cost?

  • Different types of fish require different aquarium environments. You should build your aquarium around the needs of your fish rather than on the aesthetics of the aquarium itself. Focusing on the needs of the fish you want to keep will insure they will be healthy and happy in their environment.
  • Every decision about the aquarium and all supplies, including food, should be made with the health of your particular fish species in mind.

  • With that said, for practical reasons you’ll also need to consider what size aquarium you can afford and have the space for, and where you’ll set it up in your home. Aquariums aren’t just large fish bowls – even the most basic models come equipped with filtration systems, artificial lighting systems, often a heater or chiller, and some have hoods.




Fish can make wonderful pets and aquarium keeping provides a fascinating hobby for many fish enthusiasts.

As is the case with a dog, cat, exotic or pocket pet, preparation is priceless when it comes to committing to the care and guardianship of another living being.

Monday, February 16, 2015

Labrador Retrievers




The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman's helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today's Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he's America's most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.

The warm and intelligent Lab is America's number one breed registered with the American Kennel Club. Even non-dog people can recognize a Lab, and artists and photographers have captured his image countless times — usually as the loyal companion, waiting patiently by his owner's side. Built for sport, the Lab is muscular and athletic. He has a short, easy-care coat, friendly demeanor, keen intelligence, and plenty of energy. Devotion to this breed runs deep; Labs are loving, people-oriented dogs who live to serve their families, and owners and fans sometimes liken their Labs to angels.

The breed originated on the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called the St. John's dog, after the capital city of Newfoundland, he was bred to help the local fishermen — hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish that had escaped the nets — as well as to be a family dog.

Today, most Labs skip the hard labor and spend their days being pampered and loved by their people. However, some Labs still serve as indispensable working dogs.


The Lab's sweet nature makes him an excellent therapy dog, visiting homes for the elderly and hospitals, and his intelligence makes him an ideal assistance dog for the handicapped. He also excels as a search and rescue dog or as a retriever for hunters, thanks to his athletic build, strong nose, and courageous nature.


And Labs have also become the breed to beat at dog sports such as agility and obedience competitions — especially obedience.
There's one dog job that Labs are hopeless at: watchdog. 


In fact, owners say their sweet, helpful Lab is likely to greet an intruder and happily show him where the goods are stashed.
Labrador Retrievers have proven their usefulness and versatility throughout the breed's history, easily shifting from fisherman's companion, to field retriever, to show dog, to modern working dog. One role has remained constant: wonderful companion and friend.






Highlights



- Labrador Retrievers love, love, love to eat, and become obese very quickly if overfed. Limit treats, give your Lab plenty of exercise, and measure out regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. And be warned that the Lab's large appetite extends to people food and even inedible items. Labradors will forage in garbage, counter surf, and can make a meal out of chewed-up items like children's toys.



- Labrador Retrievers were bred for physically demanding jobs, and they have the high energy that goes along with being a working breed. They need at least 30 to 60 minutes of exercise a day. Without it, they can vent their pent-up energy in destructive ways, such as barking and chewing.



- Labs have such a good reputation that many people think they don't need to bother with training. But Labs are large, energetic animals, and like all dogs, they need to be taught good canine manners. Sign up for puppy and obedience classes as soon as you bring your Lab home.

- Many people think of Labs as a hyperactive breed. Lab puppies are definitely lively, but most will slow down a bit as they grow up. However, they usually remain fairly active throughout their lives.

- Labrador Retrievers are not known to be escape artists, but with the right motivation — such as a whiff of something yummy — a Lab will take off. Make sure your Lab has current identification tags and a microchip.

- The Lab is America's number one dog, which means there are plenty of people breeding Labs who are more interested in filling the demand for Lab puppies than in breeding healthy dogs with good temperaments. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

- If you're looking for a puppy, you'll find that Labs vary depending on what breeder you choose. Some Labs are bred for competitions testing their skill as working dogs, and others are bred to get as close as possible to the ideal look, movement, and temperament of the breed. You'll also find breeders who aim for both looks and utility. Labs bred for the show ring tend to be slightly heavier and more solidly built than those intended for canine careers.




History



Labrador Retrievers hail from the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called St. John's dogs, after the capital city of Newfoundland, Labs served as companions and helpers to the local fishermen beginning in the 1700s.The dogs spent their days working alongside their owners, retrieving fish who had escaped hooks and towing in lines, and then returned home to spend the evening with the fishermen's family.



Although his heritage is unknown, many believe the St. John's dog was interbred with the Newfoundland Dog and other small local water dogs.



Outsiders noticed the dog's usefulness and good disposition, and English sportsmen imported a few Labs to England to serve as retrievers for hunting. The second Earl of Malmesbury was one of the first, and had St. John's dogs shipped to England sometime around 1830. The third Earl of Malmesbury was the first person to refer to the dogs as Labradors.



Amazingly, Labs — now America's most popular dog — were almost extinct by the 1880s, and the Malmesbury family and other English fans are credited with saving the breed. In Newfoundland, the breed disappeared because of government restrictions and tax laws. Families were allowed to keep no more than one dog, and owning a female was highly taxed, so girl puppies were culled from litters.



In England, however, the breed survived, and the Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as a distinct breed in 1903. The American Kennel Club followed suit in 1917, and in the '20s and '30s, British Labs were imported to establish the breed in the U.S.



The breed's popularity really began to take off after World War II, and in 1991, the Labrador Retriever became the most popular dog registered with the American Kennel Club — and he's held that distinction ever since. He also tops the list in Canada and England.



Today, Labs work in drug and explosive detection, search and rescue, therapy, assistance to the handicapped, and as retrievers for hunters. They also excel in all forms of dog competitions: show, field, agility, and obedience.





Size

Males stand 22.5 to 24.5 inches, and weigh 65 to 80 pounds. Females stand 21.5 to 23.5 inches, and weigh 55 to 70 pounds.








Personality



The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. He's outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals.
Aside from a winning personality, he has the intelligence and eagerness to please that make him easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means he is active. This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep him happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: some are rowdy, others are more laid back. All thrive on activity.


Sunday, February 15, 2015

CAT BREED - PERSIAN




As the dusty desert caravans wound their way westward from Persia and Iran, it is supposed that secreted among the rare spices and jewels on the basket-laden camels was an even more precious cargo, an occasional longhair cat. They were called Persian for their "country of origin," but hieroglyphic references as early as 1684 B.C. shroud forever their exact beginnings.

Persians, with their luxurious coats and open pansy-like faces are the number one breed in popularity. Their sweet, gentle, personalities blend into most households once they feel secure in their new environment. Creatures of habit, they are most at home in an atmosphere of security and serenity, but with love and reassurance, can easily adapt to the most boisterous of households. Their quiet, melodious voices are pleasant and non-abrasive. They communicate delightfully with their large expressive eyes and make charming pets for all ages. Persians have short heavilyboned legs to support their broad, short bodies. They like to have their feet firmly planted and are not given to high jumping and climbing. Playful but never demanding, they love to pose and will drape themselves in a favorite window or chair, enhancing the decor in much the same way as a treasured painting. Persians are tremendously responsive and become a constant source of joy and delight to their owners. Pleasurable as an unexpected sunbeam, their companionship is close and enduring.
Their long flowing coats require an indoor, protected environment. Proper maintenance requires a daily run-through with a metal comb to eliminate the potential drawbacks of tangles and hairballs. An occasional bath, attempted only after a complete comb-through and clipping of the nail tips, will keep the coat clean, healthy and beautiful. It is wise to establish the routine of the bath when they are young. While the white Persian has long been the darling of photographers and advertisers, Persians come in an astonishing number
of colors, which are divided into seven color divisions for purposes of competition.

Hairballs

Naturally, being long haired, means these cats often suffer from problems related to hairballs. This can be reduced by feeding the cat a good quality food, regular brushing, and reducing stress in the home. Both stress and low quality cat food contribute to excess shedding and hair loss in cats.

Problems Due to Face Shape
Because the trend has been to breed Persian cats with extremely pushed in noses these cats often suffer from related problems. The more pushed in the face, the more problems the cat may have. Problems include tear ducts that constantly run and will stain the fur below the eyes, if neglected this can cause sores on the skin.

Eyelashes, and hair on the nose, can cause a problem if they rub on the eyes of the cat.
The short noses
can cause breathing problems for the cat, making them more vulnerable to problems associated with warm, or cold, temperatures. This is because the longer noses give the air a chance to either warm up, or cool down, before entering the body. These cats often have small nasal passages and cannot take as much physical exertion as other cats, and tend to be more lazy as a result.
Malocclusion, or a bad bite, is also common in Persians and should be checked before buying a kitten.
Because of the facial deformity eating can be more difficult for Persian cats.

As a result of the distorted head shape it is not uncommon for Persian cats to have difficulty birthing kittens – the shape of the kitten's head does not pass easily. Still born kittens are seen more in Persians than most other breeds.
Persian cats often have side effects from Grisofulvin, a ringworm medication.
Some Persian cats have behavior problems and simply stop using their litter box (note this can also be related to kidney problems).
Persian cats are prone to hip dysplasia.
Eye diseases are common in this breed.

If not groomed regularly they will develop painful hair mats and may require shaving.


BE AWARE that when you buy a kitten from a good breeder they should have taken the parents to shows to prove they were good quality, worth breeding and had them tested for genetic health problems. One concern with the Persian cat breed is that some breeders are selecting to breed for unhealthy traits such as extreme pushed in noses.

Friday, February 13, 2015

CAT BREED - MAINE COON




Myths, legend and lore surround the Maine Coon Cat. Some are amusing, some are fantastic flights of fantasy and some are merely plausible. They certainly provide good material for conversation. Many books and articles dealing with these aspects of the Maine Coon Cat are available and have been well received as people never seem to tire of the subject and are always eager to learn more about this National Treasure.
The Maine Coon Cat is the native American long-haired cat and was first recognized as a specific breed in Maine where it was named the official cat of the state. These cats were held in high regard by the locals for their mousing talents and special competitions were even held to reward the best “Coon Cat.”

The Maine Coon cat evolved through nature’s own breeding program developing characteristics by following a “survival of the fittest” evolution. The characteristics all have a purpose or function. Maine Coons developed into sturdy, working cats suited to the harsh winters and varied seasons of the Northeast region. The Maine Coon of today is known for a sturdy, rugged appearance, which includes an uneven, shaggy coat of three distinct lengths and a long, well furnished tail. They carry that tail proudly and use it to surround themselves for warmth and protection. A Maine Coon Cat has large, well tufted paws to allow ability to walk on top of snow despite size and weight. Ears are large and well tufted for protection and warmth. Even more than for beauty, Maine Coons are noted for intelligence and kindly disposition. After all, what they couldn’t obtain themselves, they could always get by charming a nearby human. Though their size can be intimidating, they are known for their friendliness towards just about anything and are especially good with children and other pets. For these reasons, they have been dubbed the “Gentle Giant” of the cat fancy and are commonly sought after as family pets, companions, and therapy cats.
After years of local competitions and adoration, the Maine Coon Cat was chosen as Best Cat at the first major cat show ever held in the United States. “Cosey,” a brown tabby female Maine Coon Cat, was awarded this distinction at the Madison Square Garden show held in NYC in May of 1895. The silver collar and medal awarded to Cosey is on display at the CFA headquarters in Alliance, Ohio.
The transition from adorned or glorified “Barn Cat” to pedigreed CFA finalist was neither an easy one nor did it happen quickly. The Maine Coon Cat was all the rage in the early 20th century but lost popularity after the introduction of other long-haired breeds to the U.S. The Maine Coon Cat was even thought extinct in the 1950’s. Luckily, rumors of their death were greatly exaggerated and thanks to the dedication and perseverance of breeders, the Maine Coon Cat breed was accepted for CFA championship status in 1976. At present, sometimes the largest number of entries in a CFA show will be Maine Coon Cats and it is not unusual for one of them to be named Best Cat in a ring or even of the entire show. Recently, GC, NW, Highlander Tony Bennett of Wenlock achieved one of CFA’s top awards: Highest Scoring Cat in Premiership.
Maine Coon Cats are intelligent, trainable, described as “dog like”. They will offer you hours of enjoyment with their antics but can at times be intrusive. Without question they want to be part of everything and your privacy may require a closed door between you and your cat. Most Maine Coon Cats have a fondness of water, to be in it, watch it, wash their food in it, or just plain play in it, so don’t be surprised if you have an uninvited guest in your shower or help washing the dishes on any given day.



The Maine Coon Cat has a silky and somewhat oily coat, it is not dense and its upkeep is much easier than that of other longhaired breeds. The coat is almost self-maintained but will require occasional grooming. Because they love attention of any kind, grooming is easily accomplished.
Maine Coon Cats are an affordable pedigreed addition to any household. Prices vary in different areas of the country and overseas, depending on an individual breeder’s guidelines. “Show” vs. “pet” qualities are often a determining factor as well as the pedigree or titles held by the cats in the kitten’s “family tree.” However, many breeders offer retired show or breeding cats at a reduced cost to welcoming homes.



MAINE COON BEHAVIOR

Kittens are normally available after 12 weeks of age, once they are weaned, physically stable, and have received basic inoculations. Socialization, additional examinations, testing and/or guarantees will vary from breeder to breeder. Maine Coon Cats and kittens are available from reputable CFA breeders in most areas in the U.S., Canada, and overseas, however, the transportation of cats/kittens to new homes depends on the individual breeder’s practices.
Your new Maine Coon Cat addition should be kept indoors, spayed/neutered (if purchased as a pet) and be provided proper nutrition and acceptable surfaces for expression of natural behavior, for example, clean litter pans and scratching surfaces (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery and most breeders will have related stipulations as part of their contract).
Available in a variety of about 75 different color combinations (with the exception of pointed pattern and colors) and two acceptable tabby patterns (classic and mackerel), there is a Maine Coon Cat just right for anyone. Although it is impossible to predict longevity, with proper care and nutrition, your Maine Coon Cat should give you many years of love, enjoyment, and companionship. For more information, please contact the Breed Council Secretary for this breed.

Your Cat Is Eating Constantly ?


As a cat guardian, you know that if your cat goes off his food for more than a day or so, a trip to the vet is probably in order. But did you know that constant eating can be a sign of health problems, both physical and psychological? Here are some reasons why your cat may be overeating.


Your cat has worms
Roundworms can cause your cat to become very hungry, because the worms are taking all the nutrition from his food before he can get it. Ironically, a roundworm-infested cat may look fat, as the parasites cause his body to swell.
Roundworms are contagious to humans, so if you suspect your cat has them, bring a fecal sample to your vet to have it tested.


Your cat has hyperthyroidism or diabetes
These diseases both cause a vast increase in appetite: hyperthyroidism does so because your cat’s metabolism is burning too many calories, and diabetes because your cat’s body can’t convert sugar to energy -- and the nutrition doesn’t even get into his body in the first place. If your cat is eating constantly and still losing weight, and especially if he’s also drinking a lot of water, get him to the vet as soon as possible.


Your cat is bored or lonely
Just like humans, some cats will eat because they’re bored. The solution to this problem is to provide your cat with more stimulation and to stop leaving kibble out for him to munch on all day. If you want to have a supply of food available, provide it in puzzle toys, which will cause your cat to have to work for his meal. This will help him burn calories and keep his mind engaged.
Be sure to provide other intellectually stimulating toys (or maybe even a kitty friend) to keep his mind off his dish. You can also buy automatic feeders, which provide access to a set amount of food at set times of day.


Your cat is depressed
Overeating can be a self-soothing behavior for cats who are depressed or grieving. I’ve seen this happen: I once met a couple who had a cat they'd exiled to the basement after their baby was born. In response, the cat started eating to self-soothe, and the result was incredibly sad.
If your cat is depressed, try drawing him out of his shell with gentle interactive play. Give him “love blinks” -- close your eyes slowly, leave them closed for a second, and then open them slowly, while thinking “I love you.”


Your cat's food isn’t meeting his nutritional needs

You know how when you eat fast food, you’re usually hungry an hour later no matter how much you ate? Poor-quality cat food can have the same effect on your cat. And like a person who eats a lot of fast food or who can only afford starchy foods, your cat will eat and eat because he can’t satisfy the true hunger (for nutrients) at the root of his desire to eat. Try feeding canned food; it’s typically more nutrient-dense, tastes better, and the cost ends up being about the same as kibble when you feed your cat the proper amount.
Remember that cats’ stomachs are extremely small: a couple of tablespoons of canned or raw food or (not and) a third of a cup of kibble per feeding is about all a cat needs to stay fit and healthy. Of course, if your cat a 20-pound Maine Coon, he’ll need a lot more food than a petite Singapura, so be sure to work with your vet to figure out the most appropriate amount to feed your feline friend.

Blogger news