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Sunday, May 31, 2015

Beagle

The Beagle is a happy, inquisitive, shorthaired hound who makes a great family companion, an eager hunter in the field — or both!



Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as ascenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.


It's difficult to resist the appeal of a Beagle's dark brown or hazel eyes, with his soft, pleading expression. They're happy, outgoing and loving — characteristics more than balanced out by their hound nature, which is inquisitive, determined, and focused on food. They aren't yappy dogs, but they do have three distinct vocalizations — a bark/growl, a baying howl, and a half-baying howl (a cross between a frantic bark and a bay). The half-howl vocalization usually is reserved for when they catch sight of quarry — or think it's time to wake the neighbors at 6 a.m.! Being pack dogs, they generally get along well with other animals and their human friends — and they think everyone is their new best friend. The most important thing to know about the Beagle is that he is a scenthound. His nose is the most important part of his anatomy and his head is always down to the ground, searching for an interesting trail to follow. Beagles have approximately 220 million scent receptors compared to the paltry 5 million or so in people, which makes them very good at picking up scents. Humorist Dave Barry once described his in-laws' Beagle as "a nose with feet."


You may have seen the Beagle's nose at work at airports across the country. In 1984, the U.S. Department of Agriculture decided to use Beagles to sniff out contraband food being brought into the United States at the Los Angeles International Airport.
The experiment was a huge success. Because they are small, friendly, and cute, the Beagles didn't intimidate people who are afraid of dogs, and with their super nose power, they could be trained to identify specific food articles while bypassing those that weren't contraband. Today, members of the "Beagle Brigade" patrol the baggage-claim areas at more than 20 international airports and other points of entry into the United States.

Although they've branched out into other fields of work, Beagles remain superb hunters of small game. The National Beagle Club's Institute Farm hosts AKC-sanctioned field trials where breeders with packs are put to the test in the field. Many other countries have similar activities for hunting Beagles.


Because of their small size and gentle temperament, Beagles can do well in apartments if their people are willing to walk them on lead several times a day in all kinds of weather. They need plenty of exercise, about an hour a day if possible. If left alone and unexercised, Beagles can become destructive.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Border Collie



The Border Collie dog breed was developed to gather and control sheep in the hilly border country between Scotland and England. He is known for his intense stare, or "eye," with which he controls his flock. He's a dog with unlimited energy, stamina, and working drive, all of which make him a premier herding dog; he's still used today to herd sheep on farms and ranches around the world. The highly trainable and intelligent Border Collie also excels in various canine sports, including obedience, flyball, agility, tracking, and flying disc competitions.

If you've ever had the pleasure of watching a Border Collie herd sheep, you know you're watching a master craftsman at work, with his intense stare as he approaches the sheep, his almost intuitive response to the shepherd's command, and the skillful manner in which he maneuvers the sheep exactly where the shepherd wants them to go. It is awe-inspiring.

The Border Collie, a medium-sized dog at 30 to 45 pounds, possesses a seemingly supernatural amount of energy and stamina — a hardiness that was developed when he was required to work all day in the hills and valleys of the rugged Scottish border country, sometimes running 50 miles or more a day. When it comes to the ideal working dog, it doesn't get much better than the Border Collie.


If there is a dark side to the Border Collie's energy and workaholic attitude, it comes out when he's brought into a family that doesn't understand him. He is not a cuddly, couch-potato dog. He doesn't want to be coddled. He wants — and needs — a job. Keeping up with the Border Collie's intense mental and physical stamina is exhausting, even exasperating, to an owner or family that wants a laid-back family pet.
The Border Collie is a herding dog, which means he has an overwhelming urge to gather a flock. That flock could be sheep, children, cats, squirrels, or anything that moves, including cars. This instinct to nip, nudge, and bark, along with his energy, cannot be trained out of him. Rather, it must be directed. He must have a task, whether it's actually herding sheep or competing in dog sports. A brisk walk or a game of fetch every day isn't enough activity for the Border Collie.

That said, for the right owner, a Border Collie is a wonderful dog to live with. His intelligence and tractable nature make him easy to train. He's sensitive and, according to those who know him well, he has an uncanny ability to know what you're going to ask of him before you ask it. If he is well socialized and trained from puppyhood, he can adapt to almost any living situation that provides the mental and physical exercise he requires.
The Border Collie is a good match for an owner who is as active as he is, especially one who's eager to get involved in dog sports. With the right training, this breed excels in any activity he tries, including sheepdog trials, agility, flyball, flying disc, advanced obedience, freestyle obedience, or tracking.The owner or family that's willing to properly socialize and train the Border Collie will find a soul mate in this intelligent, sensitive breed.



The Border Collie is highly sensitive, often responsive to the subtlest command and seemingly able to predict his owner's desires in advance.
A workaholic who thrives on mental and physical stimulation, the Border Collie must have a positive way to direct his energy. Otherwise he'll invent his own games — and he can become a problem to live with.
The Border Collie will herd anything that moves, including children, cars, people on bikes, cats, and squirrels. He can become a real problem if he's allowed to roam in a neighborhood; a securely fenced yard is essential.
The noisy play of young children can stimulate the Border Collie's herding instinct and cause him to nip, nudge, and bark.
To prevent shyness, the Border Collie must be well socialized.

The Border Collie doesn't usually roam, but his curiosity and intelligence can lead him to become an escape artist.
To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.


Quite simply, the Border Collie is a dynamo. His personality is characteristically alert, energetic, hardworking, and smart. He learns quickly — so quickly that it's sometimes difficult to keep him challenged.

This breed likes to be busy. In fact, he must be busy or he becomes bored, which leads to annoying behavior, such as barking, digging, or chasing cars. He's not a dog to lie quietly on the front porch while you sip a glass of lemonade; he thrives on activity. Remember, he was bred to run and work all day herding sheep.
The Border Collie is also renowned for being highly sensitive to his handler's every cue, from a whistle to a hand signal to a raised eyebrow.

Of course, the Border Collie isn't perfect. He can be strong-minded and independent, and his compulsion to herd can become misdirected. In the absence of sheep, or some kind of job, he is apt to gather and chase children, cars, or pets.

He can also become fearful or shy if he isn't properly socialized as a puppy. Puppy classes and plenty of exposure to a variety of people, places, and things help the sensitive Border Collie gain confidence.

Monday, May 25, 2015

How much exercise does my puppy need?


Humans need exercise to feel better, look better and live a healthy life. And the dogs in our lives are no different. Dogs are built for activity. In fact, stray cats and dogs can travel 20 to 30 miles (32 to 48 kilometers) a day. Their domesticated counterparts certainly don't need to cover that much ground every day, but they still need to be regularly moving on all fours.




Daily exercise is good for both your pooch's mental and physical well-being. Exercise can help your baby dog avoid arthritis and other problems with his joints later on in life. Dogs are also prone to the same types of obesity-related illnesses as humans, so exercise is crucial to helping them keep off the pounds. Basically, getting your dog in the habit of regular physical activity while he's young is the cornerstone to a long healthy life and helps his physical development.

Puppies also need exercise for mental stimulation (SEE MORE). Moving around keeps them from becoming bored and mischievous. Many owners find that taking their dogs out for regular outdoor play and walks cuts down on behavioral issues like incessant chewing and digging and nonstop barking that make owners want to pull their hair out.


How Much is Enough?
Make sure you're consistent with the amount of exercise your puppy gets. You need to help him build his stamina, and the only way he can do this is by exercising regularly but with caution. At the puppy stage, he's much too young to be doing the rigorous activities that he will be more able to do as he grows older.The amount of exercise your puppy needs depends on his age, breed and medical condition. Not every breed will be up for a long walk through Central Park. Some breeds are just not built to go the distance, while others are always ready to romp. Some of the breeds that need the most exercise are Border collies, Labrador retrievers, Jack Russell terriers and Dalmatians.

Puppies need five minutes of exercise per month of age up to twice a day, according to the U.K. Kennel Club. In other words, a 3-month-old puppy will need 15 minutes of exercise while a 4-month-old will need 20 minutes. This may take the form of low-impact activities like swimming or playing with small dog exercise balls. You can also take your puppy out for short walks on a leash. However, if he starts to sit down, give him time to rest. If he does not start walking again, you may have to carry him home.


Most adult dogs should participate in some form of physical activity for at least 30 minutes and up to two hours every day. Your puppy's genetics will determine when it's time to move her up to adult dog exercise. If she won't get any larger than 25 pounds (11 kilograms), then she can start at around 9 months. If she'll end up weighing between 25 to 100 pounds (11 to 45 kilograms), it's best to wait until she's at least 14 months old. If she'll be tipping the scale at 100 pounds (45 kilograms) or more, you can introduce these activities to her when she is at least a year and a half old.
So, how will your pooch feel after exercising? Pretty much the same as you and I feel after a great workout. Taking your puppy on a nice short walk or letting him play in the yard translates to a calmer canine that will more than likely sleep very well that night.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Cavalier King Charles

Although he's born to be a companion, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dog breed retains the sporty nature of his spaniel ancestors. If he's not sitting on a lap or getting a belly rub, nothing makes him happier than to flush a bird and then attempt to retrieve it. One of the largest of the toy breeds, he's often as athletic as a true sporting breed and enjoys hiking, running on the beach, and dog sports such as agility, flyball and rally. Some have even shown their prowess as hunting dogs. The more restful members of the breed find success as family friends and therapy dogs.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a beautiful small dog that undoubtedly is a contender for the title of "top tail-wagger." In fact, among the characteristics that Cavalier breeders strive to attain is a tail in constant motion when this breed is moving.


If the characteristic wagging of the Cavalier's plumy tail doesn't melt your heart, surely his large, dark round eyes will. Warm and lustrous, with a sweet expression, they hold the power to extract constant petting and unlimited supplies of food from people under their spell. Not surprisingly, this breed can easily become fat, which spoils its lovely lines, so be strong and offer a walk or playtime instead of the potato chips and pizza your Cavalier is angling for.
Cavaliers pad through the house on slippered paws, always following in the footsteps of their people. With a Cavalier in residence, you'll never be alone — not even in the bathroom. Because they're so attached to their people, they do best when someone is at home during the day to keep them company. They are a housedog and will never thrive in an environment where they're relegated to the backyard or otherwise ignored.

When it comes to training, Cavaliers are generally intelligent and willing to try whatever it is you'd like them to do. Food rewards and positive reinforcement help ensure that training goes smoothly. Cavaliers have a soft personality, so yelling at them is counterproductive and likely to send these sweeties into the sulks or into hiding. Instead, reward them every time you see them doing something you like, whether it's chewing on a toy instead of your Prada pumps or not barking in response when the dog next door barks. They'll fall all over themselves to find more things that you like.



As with many toy breeds, Cavaliers can have issues with housetraining, but if you keep them on a consistent schedule, with plenty of opportunities to potty outdoors, they can become trustworthy in the home.

While the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a relatively new breed, recreated less than a century ago, his prototype is the toy spaniel that has existed for centuries as a companion to royalty and nobility.

Cavaliers are descended from the same toy spaniels depicted in many 16th, 17th, and 18th century paintings by famous artists such as Van Dyck and Gainsborough. The spaniels in those paintings had flat heads, high-set ears, and longish noses.

These little spaniels were great favorites of royal and noble families in England. Mary, Queen of Scots had a toy spaniel who accompanied her as she walked to her beheading, and her grandson, Charles I, and great-grandson, Charles II — who gave their name to the breed — loved the little dogs as well. It's said that King Charles II, who reigned from 1660 to 1685, never went anywhere without at least two or three of these little spaniels. He even decreed that the spaniels should be allowed in any public place, including the Houses of Parliament. It's claimed that the decree is still in effect today in England, although no one has tested it recently to see if it's true.

After Charles II's death, the King Charles Spaniels' popularity waned, and Pugs and other short-faced breeds became the new royal favorites. The King Charles Spaniels were bred with these dogs and eventually developed many of their features, such as the shorter nose and the domed head.

There was one stronghold of the King Charles Spaniels that were of the type that King Charles himself had so loved — and that was at Blenheim Palace, the country estate of the Dukes of Marlborough. Here, a strain of red and white Toy Spaniels continued to be bred, which is why Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with this coloration are called Blenheim today.

Since there was no standard for the breed and no dog shows yet, the type and size of the toy spaniels bred by the Dukes of Marlborough varied. In the mid-19th century, however, English breeders started holding dog shows and trying to refine different dog breeds. By that time, the toy spaniel was accepted as having a flat face, undershot jaw, domed skull and large, round, front-facing eyes. The King Charles Spaniels depicted in paintings from earlier centuries were almost extinct.

In the 1920s, an American named Roswell Eldridge started searching in England for toy spaniels that resembled those in the old paintings. He searched for more than five years, even taking his search to the Crufts Dog Show, where he persuaded the Kennel Club (England's equivalent to the American Kennel Club) to allow him to offer 25 pounds sterling — a huge sum at the time — for the best dog and best bitch of the type seen in King Charles II's reign. He offered this prize for five years.

In 1928, Miss Mostyn Walker presented a dog named Ann's Son for evaluation and was awarded the 25-pound prize. Roswell Eldridge didn't live to see the prize claimed, as he had died just one month before Crufts. Interest in the breed revived, and a breed club was formed. The name Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was chosen to differentiate the breed from the flat-faced King Charles Spaniel (known as the English Toy Spaniel in the United States).

The club held its first meeting on the second day of Crufts in 1928 and drew up a breed standard, a written description of how the breed should look. Ann's Son was presented as an example of the breed, and club members gathered up all of the copies of pictures of the old paintings that had little dogs of this type in them. One thing that all club members agreed upon from the start was that the Cavalier King Charles Spaniels would be kept as natural as possible and trimming and shaping of the dog for the show ring would be discouraged.

The Kennel Club was reluctant to recognize the new breed, but finally, in 1945, after years of work by the breeders, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was recognized as a separate breed.

In the 1940s, two male Cavaliers were imported into the U.S. from England — Robrull of Veren and Bertie of Rookerynook. It wasn't until 1952, however, that Cavaliers had their true beginnings in the U.S. In that year, Mrs. (Sally) Lyons Brown of Kentucky was given a black and tan bitch puppy named Psyche of Eyeworth by her English friend, Lady Mary Forwood. She fell in love with the breed and imported more.

When she found that she couldn't register her dogs with the American Kennel Club, she started contacting people in the U.S. that had Cavaliers. At that time, there were fewer than a dozen. In 1954, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club, USA (CKCSC, USA), the official breed club and only registering body for Cavaliers in the United States for more than fifty years.

During these years, the members of the CKCSC, USA decided against pushing for full recognition of the breed, feeling that the club's strict code of ethics prevented the breed from being commercially bred. They feared that too much recognition of the breed would lead to it becoming too popular and therefore too attractive for breeders who wouldn't maintain the standards they had established. Mostly, they kept the AKC Miscellaneous status so that members who wanted to show their dogs in obedience could do so.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Dog Quotes 3

"If there is no heaven for dogs, then I want to go where they go when I die."
    -Anonymous



"The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too."
    -Samuel Butler


"If dogs could talk, perhaps we would find it as hard to get along with them as we do with people."
    -Capek


"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself."
    -Billings


"The dog who meets with a good master is the happier of the two."
    -Maeterlinck





"There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face."
    -Ben Williams


"Whoever said you canÂ’t buy happiness forgot about little puppies."
    -Gene Hill


"No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as much as the dog does."
    -Christopher Morley


"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself."
    -Josh Billings





"The average dog is a nicer person than the average person."
    -Andrew A.



"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."


-Unknown


"I've seen a look in dogsÂ’ eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts."
    -John Steinbeck



"If your dog doesn't like someone you probably shouldn't either."
-Unknown
"Old dogs, like old shoes, are comfortable. They might be a bit out of shape and a little worn around the edges, but they fit well."
    -Bonnie Wilcox


"The more people I meet the more I like my dog"
    -Unknown


"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog."
    -Edward Hoagland


"I once decided not to date a guy because he wasn't excited to meet my dog. I mean, this was like not wanting to meet my mother."
    -Bonnie Schacter





"No Matter how little money and how few possessions, you own, having a dog makes you rich."
    -Louis Sabin


"Money will buy you a pretty good dog, but it won't buy the wag of his tail."
    -Josh Billings


"A piece of grass a day keeps the vet away"
    -Unknown Dog


"Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole."
    -Roger Caras




"Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently at nothing right in your ear."
    -Dave Barry


"The dog was created specially for children. He is the god of frolic."
    -Henry Ward


"To his dog, every man is Napolean, hence the constant popularity of dogs."
    -Aldous Huxley


"Did you ever walk into a room and forget why you walked in? I think that is how dogs spend their lives."
    -Sue Murphy


"Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends."
    -Alexander Pope


"Do not make the mistake of treating your dogs like humans or they will treat you like dogs."
    -Martha Scott


"Every dog must have his day."
    -Jonathan Swift


"I loathe people who keep dogs. They are cowards who have not got the guts to bite people themselves."
    -August Strindberg


"I have always thought of a dog lover as a dog that was in love with another dog."
    -James Thurber


"Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful."
    -Ann Landers

Fish Breeding


Fish keepers start out with a few tropical fish or maybe some gold fish in a small aquarium. But they soon want to know more about how their fish live, and especially how they breed.

General aspects of fish breeding, just like with fish keeping, include proper feeding and providing the right environment. The breeding environment needs to be maintained with proper water conditions and you need to watch for disease or other ailments.
Some fish are easy to breed and will readily spawn in a community tank. But most fish need a bit more help. Understanding the spawning behaviors and needs for the particular type of fish will make fish breeding successful and rewarding.
Carefully selecting the "brood stock" (parent fish) and condition them on a good varied diet is important. A fish breeding tank is needed for many species as well. The breeding aquarium needs to have the right water conditions to stimulate spawning and for the eggs to hatch. Consideration also needs to be given to the fry and their survival. The first foods for the fry, before they become free swimming, and foods for the fry to grow are important. It's also important that they are protected and have places to hide.



For first timers, or those who are new to the hobby, it's advisable to start out with some of the easy to breed livebearers. These include the Guppies and Platies. Then move on to some of the hardy egg-layers, like Danios and Barbs. Experience with these initial undertakings will greatly help in keeping and breeding many other types of fish, including some of the very difficult species.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Breeds That Enjoy Cuddling The Most


Skye Terrier




This compact canine isn’t the typical terrier type. Give this dog his daily walk and he will be content to curl up on the couch. As long as his human is close, the Skye Terrier is a happy non-camper.



Tibetan Spaniel



Bred for companionship, the Tibetan Spaniel needs a daily leg stretch (as all dogs do) before they reclaim their place on the sofa, next to a warm body of course.





Newfoundland



Weighing in between 150-175 pounds, the Newfoundland is an incredibly easy breed to keep happy. After a walk they’re content to stretch out on a Lazy-boy next to their human. However, they may wonder why the human isn’t so keen to share the furniture with them.







Basset Hound

These droopy eared canines are just 
as enjoyable to watch romp as they are to snuggle with. Bassets are likely to share a companion’s taste in movies, music and snacks provided they get first dibs on the snacks.


Whippet

Swifter than lions, the whippets feet may skim the ground as they fly around a dog park, working off the long night’s sleep. By the time they get home, it’s time for a long siesta, and some good old fashioned snuggle time.

Great Dane

Don’t let the size fool you, Great Danes are incredibly laid back and content to bask in the warmth of the sun, next to the person they love most. Snacks are optional, but should be considered. Daily walks are encouraged, to rev up the appetite.




Havanese

Cheerful, loyal, happy, gentle are a few of the adjectives used to describe the Havanese. They are considered playful, a rousing game of fetch in the living room, a daily walk and hours of cuddles, this dog would continue to be cheerful and happy.




Chinese Crested

Whether it is decided to live with the “powder puff” or the “hairless” variety, the Chinese Crested breed is considered charming and friendly. Use the couch time to knit a sweater for the hairless one it may need a little extra warmth on those chilly morning walks.




English Mastiff

Belly scratches. English Mastiffs love a good belly scratch, while stretched out across the sofa, watching Dog TV. The dog may seem reluctant to go on his daily walk, that is only because the couch cushions are finally where he wants them.




Greyhound

Laid back and devoted, two words greyhound owners use to describe this breed. These racing dogs have earned their spots on the couch. With a daily walk about town, there is nothing better than circling a cushion three times and plopping down for a spell.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

How to Break Up a Dog Fight Without Getting Bitten



Separating Feuding Fidos



If you have a dog and he goes to the dog park, lives with doggie housemates, or otherwise socializes with other dogs, chances are at some point you may need to break up a spat. These may range from low-level altercations with no real contact to a no-bites-spared brawl. So what should you do? First, realize that regardless of the amount of noise, most fights between unfamiliar dogs at the dog park or first fights between housemates are spit and drool matches. When bites are involved during these fights, dogs generally bite and release. So in the majority of cases we do not need to worry about prying the jaws open or getting dogs to actually release. Instead, our major concern is just getting the dogs apart and to do so without getting bitten. The number one way to avoid being bitten is to avoid trying to grab the head or neck area. Frequently while trying to grab the front end or getting in the between the dogs, the humans accidentally get bitten. Alternatively, in the heat of the moment a dog may actually turn and redirect the aggression to the person pulling them away.

The safest method to get the dogs apart is to grab them by the rear end and quickly pull them away. In other cases, because of your positioning in relation to the dog or because they are moving around too quickly, you may need to shove one away by placing your foot on their rib cage and pushing. This is safer than bending over and trying to push with your hands. It may also allow you to use your hands to grasp the other dog if you don’t have someone else to help.



Other methods for separating dogs include spraying them with water, placing a board or object between them, or banging a noisy object near them. These techniques are all meant to distract them. Other surprisingly benign distractions may work too, says Melissa Morris, a dog trainer who recounts the case of her mom’s dog. “Her shepherd, Ruby, attacked a visiting yellow lab. Ruby grabbed the lab's neck and wouldn't let go. My mom was yelling at Ruby. My brother-in-law was there and punched Ruby in the head, trying to get her to let go. All that did was hurt his hand! My mom was holding a newspaper and lightly hit Ruby on the head with it (newspaper was not rolled up). That distracted Ruby and she let go.”


What to Do Once the Dogs Are Apart

Once you have the dogs apart you should pay attention—does your dog want to keep fighting or does he immediately calm down or try to get away? The one who wants to continue fighting will require more work to modify the behavior in the future. In either case you’ll want to understand why a fight occurred instead of just assuming it was a fluke or hoping the same type of situation won’t occur again. A majority of the dog aggressive behavior cases involving bites that I treat have a history of getting into lower level spats, which over time, developed into more dangerous fights. Many fights can be prevented simply by noticing when one dog is tense around another, calling the two dogs apart before there’s trouble and then rewarding your dog for good behavior.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Most Expensive Cats in the World

Many people indulge in furry feline companions, however, investing breeds that are of luxury status is common as well. Many of us have heard about super-expensive dogs, but we’ve not really come across cats being as expensive, turns out they can be oven more costly. The prices are based solely on the purchase of the animal, taking care of them adds to the price as well. Here is the list of the 5 most expensive cats in the world.



Peterbald Cat 
This feline can cost anywhere between $1000 – $5000. This bald cat is the latest breed and the most sought after too. A lot of care goes into raising these cats, due to them being hairless, a lot more care must be done to maintain them.






Persian Cat
This cute furry friend would cost you somewhere between $1,000 – $6,000. These long haired lap cats can range in color and sizes.





Bengal Cat
Now this fierce cat has the traits of a dog and is very playful.  This tough feline with a marbled or spotted coat would cost you anywhere from $1,000 – $10,000.





Savannah Cat
The Savannah is slightly bigger in form when compared to the Bengal and has a coat that resembles that of a leopard. This wild looking cat would cost you anywhere between$15,000 – $35,000 as it is a cross breed between a domestic cat and an African Serval.





Ashera Cat
The Ashera is the most expensive feline breed in the world and is priced at $27,950. This cat is hypoallergenic and comes from a biotech company by the name of Lifestyle Pets that has gained proficiency in the production of hypoallergenic pets. Since its inception in 2004, the company has come under the scanner many a times, particularly because the hypoallergenic trait has not been scientifically proved in the cats. In fact, some customers claim that in spite of payment, they have not received the cat till date. A cattery in Pennsylvania has claimed that the company is basically trying to create a new buzz and is actually reselling Savannah cats at a higher cost. However, according to insurance companies that cats that make it to the top three in terms of insurance claims were Siamese, Bengals and Himalayans!



Sunday, May 10, 2015

Active Puppies in the park


Dogs are social creatures. In addition to spending time with their human family members, pups also like to socialize with other dogs. Dog parks provide the perfect venue for pooches to play and exercise with other dogs in a safe and controlled setting. However, introducing a puppy to the dog park scene might cause a pet owner some anxiety. How do you keep your puppy safe in this new environment full of other canines?

Puppies present a unique set of challenges to their owners when being introduced to dog parks. Puppies generally are more active and curious than adult canines which could lead to more conflict with other dogs; however, with caution and preparation, puppies can enjoy dog parks while learning important social interaction skills.


To start off, puppies younger than 4 months old shouldn't be brought to the dog park. They have not been fully immunized and will be susceptible to catching diseases from other dogs. If an older dog displays aggressive behavior towards him, your puppy could be traumatized during a very important stage of his social development. But once your dog is fully immunized and ready to be around new dogs, visits to the dog park will help him to develop good etiquette for healthy interaction with his fellow canines.

The key to keeping your active puppy safe at the dog park is to have a good grasp on how your dog will respond to other dogs. Before taking your puppy to the dog park, test how your dog will react to meeting a new canine friend. Introduce your puppy to a friend or neighbor's dog to gauge how he'll react.Next, we'll take a look at some more useful tips for keeping your romping bundle of fur safe once he gets to the dog park.
Once you've prepped your dog to enter the dog park, start off in a cautious manner. Evenings during the week, holidays, and weekends tend to be busy times for dog parks, so it's best to introduce your dog to the park when there's not a big canine crowd. Walk your dog before you take him to the dog park so that he's not too wound up with energy. Keep your first visit short so as not to overwhelm your puppy. Start out with a 15-minute visit, and slowly increase the length of your stay.

Once you've entered the unleashed area of the dog park, be sure to let your dog off his leash.

Mixing unleashed and leashed dogs can create a hostile environment. Leashed dogs and their owners can display body language that might be perceived by unleashed dogs as threatening, causing the unleashed dogs to act in an aggressive manner. Also, don't bring treats or toys to the dog park. Rewards and snacks might create jealousy and aggression between puppies.
Once your puppy is acclimated to the dog park scene, you still have to be vigilant about supervising him. Watch him closely when he's interacting with other dogs; keep an eye on both his body language and the body language of other canines. If he starts to become fearful or aggressive, it's time to leave the park. But with a little forethought and preparation, an active puppy will have a safe and rewarding dog park experience.

Thursday, May 7, 2015

The Vet

Veterinary medicine is one of many areas of knowledge linked to the maintenance and restoration of health. She works in a broad sense, to the prevention and cure of diseases of animals and humans in a medical context. Being the professional business area of ​​animal / public health formed a Faculty of Veterinary Medicine or an educational establishment Highly Qualified.
Veterinary medicine is the medical science that is dedicated to the prevention, control, eradication and treatment of disease, trauma or any other damage to health of animals, beyond the control of the health of products and by-products of animal origin for human consumption. It also seeks to ensure the quality, quantity and safety of stocks of animal food through animal health control and processes to get their products.

The veterinarian also popularly called Doctor, is the professional authorized by the state to practice Veterinary Medicine, taking care of animal health by preventing, diagnosing and curing the disease, which requires detailed knowledge of academic subjects (such as anatomy and physiology ) behind the disease and treatment - the science of medicine - and competence in its applied practice - the art of medicine.
Both the doctor's role and the meaning of the word vary significantly around the world, but as a general understanding, medical ethics requires that physicians show consideration, compassion and benevolence towards their animal patients. Veterinarians can be general, that is not specialized in any particular area or specialists when specializing in some area.
With understanding the science of the origin and spread of various diseases, and as vectors domestic or wild animals, and to ensure the very physical safety of animals, veterinary medicine has become an important adjunct in public health policies of countries. Spread of epidemic disease, human or animal, is the installation of veterinary barriers that prevent their spread an effective means of control.
Allied to this, one of the fields of Veterinary Medicine which is in great rise is the Animal Health Protection, whose objectives are precisely to prevent the occurrence of exotic diseases which may have serious impacts on public health or economic animals, and control or eradicate endemic diseases.
Currently, they are recognized over a hundred zoonoses and numerous other infectious animal diseases that bring serious economic consequences. To combat them, the veterinarian sanitarian exerts Epidemiological Surveillance active, acting directly in the field and controlling the movement of animals, performing the inspection of animal products - such as meat products, milk, eggs, fish and honey looking for signs of diseases that can be transmitted to humans or that might indicate the health status of the herds.

Monday, May 4, 2015

Stop Your Cat From Biting Your Ankles

Does this describe your home? You get up out of bed and start walking to the bathroom, only to have your ankles become the target of a cat attack. Does your cat hide under the bed under the moment when she sees your bare feet hit the floor and then she sinks her teeth or claws into your flesh? Perhaps your cat waits around the corner for that moment when you walk down the hallway and then she launches into a perfectly timed ankle attack. Is there a solution? Yes.

Ankle Attraction



The reason your cat targets your ankles is because they’re a moving target and if there’s no other option for play or stimulation, kitty will focus on what is currently available. The prey-drive is triggered by objects moving across or away from the cat’s visual field. If your cat isn’t getting adequate stimulation and playtime opportunities through interactive play therapy or adequate environmental enrichment then she’s going to take it upon herself to find a substitute. Unfortunately, that substitute is a painful one to the human family member.


Increase the Fun Factor

In order to stop the ankle attacks you need to provide the cat with a better option and that comes in the form of playtime opportunities with appropriate toys. You’ll do this in two ways. First, set up a schedule of doing interactive play therapy on a daily basis. Use a fishing pole-type toy so you can mimic the movements of prey. The fishing pole toy also puts a distance between your skin and the cat’s teeth so it teaches the cat what is an acceptable target. Since cats would have several opportunities to hunt in an outdoor setting, schedule at least two interactive play sessions per day.




Next on the list is to increase the fun factor in the overall environment. This will enable your cat to have opportunities for playtime even when you aren’t home. Use puzzle feeders for your cat so she’ll have lots of chances to “work” for food. Puzzle feeders provide cats with a natural progression of the hunt and the reward. You can also rotate your cat’s regular toys so they don’t become boring. Take a long look at the types of solo toys you’ve bought and see if they could use some improvement. A fuzzy ball is boring when it’s sitting in the toy basket but if you place it inside of an open paper bag that on its side on the floor then you’ve increased the fun factor.

There are many ways to increase environmental enrichment in your home so that your ankles are no longer the most appealing target. Use your imagination and create homemade puzzles and toys. Set up a cat tree by a window. Install a bird feeder outside. Use a “think like a cat” approach to looking at the environment from a cat’s point of view. Is it a boring environment? If so, then it’s time to roll up your sleeves and add some fun into your cat’s life.


How to Handle an Ankle Attack


If your cat has his paws wrapped around your ankle and his teeth are sinking into your skin, what’s the best thing to do? One thing you shouldn’t do is run or pull away because that will often only result in the cat biting down harder. Prey moves away so don’t act like prey when you’re bitten. Instead, confuse your cat by gently pushing toward her. This will often cause her to release her grasp because no self-respecting prey willingly heads toward the predator. Once the cat releases her grasp, stay still and ignore her. She’ll soon learn that biting flesh results in an immediate end to the fun.

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Rhodesian Ridgeback




THIS POST IS A TRIBUTE TO SIMBA FROM PORTUGAL AND HIS FRIENDS AND FAMILY


The first thing people notice about the Rhodesian Ridgeback is usually the characteristic ridge that runs down his spine and gives him his name. The ridge reveals part of his heritage, which is a mix of European hunting dogs and African dogs who had the distinctive ridge.

They also notice his strong athleticism, noble carriage, and the intelligence in his eyes. The history of the breed only adds to his allure; owners are often asked, "Did they really hunt 
lions?"The answer is yes, the Ridgeback was developed in Africa to corner and hold big game prey, such as lions, bears, and boar. Today, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is still used for hunting, and some members of the breed have even adapted to pointing and retrieving. The Rhodesian Ridgeback can also be found competing in various dog sports, including agility, lure coursing, obedience, and tracking, and he's a good hiking or jogging companion.
As a pup, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is active and exuberant, but he matures into a dog with moderate exercise needs. Give him a vigorous walk or game of fetch a couple of times a day, plus a chance to run in a safely fenced area a couple of times a week, and he'll be satisfied — at least in terms of physical exercise. This intelligent breed also needs mental stimulation: a bored Rhodesian Ridgeback is a destructive Rhodesian Ridgeback.
The Rhodesian Ridgeback is dignified and reserved toward strangers. With his family, he's a quiet, gentle companion, one who's able and willing to defend his home and people if the need arises.
Because of his size, intelligence, and power, he's not the breed for everyone. First-time or timid dog owners may find him to be much more than a handful. People who want an outgoing dog who will love everyone should keep looking. But if you are looking for a strong, confident dog, a dog who encompasses gentleness, hardheadedness, and a sense of humor in a shorthaired, easy-care package, the Rhodesian Ridgeback may be the perfect match.



The Rhodesian Ridgeback, once known as the African Lion Hound, was developed in South Africa by Boer farmers.
The farmers needed a versatile hunting dog who could withstand the extreme temperatures and terrain of the bush, survive when water rations were low, protect property, and be a companion to the entire family.
They started by crossing dogs they'd brought from Europe — such as Great Danes, Mastiffs,Greyhounds, and Bloodhounds — with a half-wild native dog kept by the Khoikhoi, a pastoral people. This dog had a distinctive ridge of hair along its back, and breeders noticed that crosses who had this ridge tended to be excellent hunters.
At first, the Boers primarily used the dogs to flush partridge or bring down a wounded buck. When big-game hunting became popular, they found that the dogs were well suited for accompanying them when they hunted lions from horseback. The dogs would hold the lion at bay until the hunters arrived.
A hunter named Cornelius von Rooyen began a breeding program in what was then known as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). A breed standard — a written description of what the breed should look and act like — was set down in 1922, and it's changed little since then. In 1924, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was officially accepted by the South African Kennel Union.

Some Rhodesian Ridgebacks may have made it to the United States as early as 1911, but it wasn't until after World War II that large numbers were imported to the U.S., Britain, and Canada. The first Rhodesian Ridgeback registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) was Tchaika of Redhouse, in 1955. The AKC recognized the breed that same year.
Today, the Rhodesian Ridgeback ranks 54th in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC. The Ridgeback is quite popular in South Africa, where he first began his journey as a breed.


The Rhodesian Ridgeback is independent and intelligent, a combination that can be entertaining, frustrating, and rewarding, all in one. It's important to begin training early and to be firm — but not harsh — and consistent.Because of his hunting roots, the Rhodesian Ridgeback has a high prey drive. That means stray cats and other small furry animals aren't safe in your yard, and it also means your yard should be securely fenced, to prevent him from going hunting on his own.
Exuberant and active in puppyhood, he matures into a quiet dog with moderate exercise needs. The Ridgeback is protective of his home and a discriminating barker who can be counted on to alert you to trouble. He's reserved with strangers but gentle and affectionate with family members.
Like every dog, Rhodesian Ridgebacks need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Ridgeback puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

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